"I am honored to work alongside motivated and dedicated colleagues."

-Lisa Nguyen


MEET THE TEACHER

Lisa Nguyen moved to Boston from California in 2007 and was “blown away” by the commitment to educating every student, every day in the Boston Public Schools. The professional learning opportunities she receives in the BPS have allowed her to thrive as an educator, and she believes the BPS supports every teacher to continuously improve their teaching practice through ongoing education. Lisa is drawn to teaching in Boston because she attended the Sacramento Unified School district, which fostered her own commitment to serve students in urban public schools.



LISA At-A-Glance

Hometown: Sacramento, California

Alma Mater (Undergraduate): University of California, San Diego

Position: Grade 5 Teacher, Kenny Elementary

Best book/website for teachers: The Morning Meeting by Roxann Kriete

Favorite place in Boston: The Arnold Arboretum/Jamaica Pond

Dinner with anyone, dead or alive: My family

How to unwind: I run, cook, or bake

Recommended restaurant in Boston: Toro, absolutely delicious


Q&A: Lisa's Perspective

The Boston Public Schools Office of Human Capital sat down with Lisa Nguyen in fall 2014 to learn more about her experiences in the Boston Public Schools as a community member, teacher, and educator of color.

Here's what we learned during our time with Lisa.

Why do you love teaching in Boston?  Many reasons, but mainly its our district's dedication to professional development. The district is working to improve teacher practice and ensure our diverse population’s needs are met with the highest quality of teaching. 

What is one of your keys to success in the classroom?  I believe that continuous reflective practice and professional development enables me to meet the needs of the spectrum of learners within my classroom. 

What is something that you are proud of professionally? I recently earned my National Board Certification. Also, presenting at NCSM regarding student engagement in math learning. 

The best lesson/unit you've ever taught?  One of the overarching themes of my class is for students to look at and discuss algebraic connections within their arithmetic computations (year long).